The Use of Adipose-Derived Progenitor Cells and Platelet-Rich Plasma Combination for the Treatment of Supraspinatus Tendinopathy in 55 Dogs: A Retrospective Study

Published:  Front Vet Sci. 2016 Sep 9;3:61. doi: 10.3389/fvets.2016.00061. eCollection 2016.

Authors:  Canapp SO Jr, Canapp DA, Ibrahim V, Carr BJ, Cox C, Barrett JG

Summary:  The stem cell field in veterinary medicine continues to evolve rapidly both experimentally and clinically. Stem cells are most commonly used in clinical veterinary medicine in therapeutic applications for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses and dogs. New technologies of assisted reproduction are being developed to apply the properties of spermatogonial stem cells to preserve endangered animal species. The same methods can be used to generate transgenic animals for production of pharmaceuticals or for use as biomedical models. Small and large animal species serve as valuable models for preclinical evaluation of stem cell applications in human beings and in veterinary patients in areas such as spinal cord injury and myocardial infarction. However, these applications have not been implemented in the clinical treatment of veterinary patients. Reviews on the use of animal models for stem cell research have been published recently. Therefore, in this review, animal model research will be reviewed only in the context of supporting the current clinical application of stem cells in veterinary medicine.

Key words:  adipose-derived stem cells; mesenchymal stem cells; platelet-rich plasma; regenerative medicine; rotator cuff; supraspinatus tendinopathy

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